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Rising Female Death Rate
November 22, 2016
9:28 pm
Jeff
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What’s great about the hedging, below, in regard to sharply-climbing infant mortality rates in Ohio, is how they use the standard (and repugnant) meme word “uptick”, which means “a small increase”.

A five percent increase in mortality rates in one year is not “small". Which is why an article from February of 2016 from the U.K. called a five percent increase in overall mortality in England and Wales in 2015 “the Biggest annual rise in deaths for almost fifty years.”

The article below also goes on to say that Ohio’s lowest-ever infant mortality of 2014 “may have just been an anomaly”, with “anomaly” being another meme word.

“Anomaly: something that deviates from what is standard, normal, or expected.”

If infant mortality rates have been trending downward over time, as noted below, then their continued descent below the 1,000 mark is not “anomalous”….that is, it is not nonstandard, nor is it abnormal, nor is unexpected…rather, it is “on trend.”

So they wildly wave their hands and try to draw your attention to the low point, in 2014, as the STRANGE thing, while calling the huge increase in mortality "small".

It’s wild, gymnastic Neurolinguistic Programming, and I’m calling it here for the record.

 

 http://www.wkyc.com/news/healt...../354907411

November 22, 2016 - Infant mortality rates increase across Ohio

Overall, infant mortality rates in Ohio have been trending downward over time, but a new report from the Ohio Department of Health showed a 5% increase from 955 in 2014 to 1,005 in 2015. The uptick indicates 2014 may have just been an anomaly – it was the first year infant deaths dropped below 1,000 since records began in 1939.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

November 22, 2016
10:17 pm
Jeff
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The article below is headlined “Is that smartphone making students more or less connected with friends and family?” Wherein the question mark is a meme, a meme that hedges.

The subhead reads “Answer: it depends.” Where “it depends” hedges again.

Then the first line of the story kicks off with “This study is a bit of fun…” With “a bit of fun” a little coating of sugar around the poison pill. Such a happy, fun subject!

The story says “male students send and receive fewer texts.” While that is technically correct, fewer hedges, in that it’s 28%, or “close to 30% fewer”. And it tells us male spend “less time” on the phone. While that is, again, technically correct, it’s more hedging, in that they log “over 20% less” phone hours than women (the number is 21%).

If there’s a problem with what the phone is delivering, and what it is delivering is dose-dependent, those are very significant numbers.

The article goes on to say that, for men, “daily calling and texting were not related in any way to feelings of emotional closeness with either parents or with peers.” While, for women, “talking on the phone was associated with feeling emotionally close with their parents.”

The article goes on to say that “For both the men and women, the study found that problematic cell phone use was negatively related to feelings of emotional closeness with parents and peers.”

Wait…you said earlier that for men there was no connection. If that’s true, then why are they being lumped in, here?

According to Lepp, the study suggests that the phone may have more social value for women compared to men, and women may be better at using it to augment or complement existing social relationships.”

Can you see how he’s stood it on its head, diabolically reversed it?

“ ‘In other words, the students in the study who tended to use their cell phones compulsively and at inappropriate times felt less socially connected to parents and peers than other students,’ Lepp said.”

There, again - twice, in succession - he lumps the “not related in any way” men in with the binge-using, 20-30%-greater-use women, calling them simply "the students". He’s a Scientist, talking in a published article about a scientific study, I beg you to remember.

Oh, and please also note that there’s no statistical breakdown of problematic cell phone use by males, vs. females.

 

 

https://theeconomyofmeaning.com/2016/08/18/is-that-smartphone-making-students-more-or-less-connected-with-friends-and-family-answer-it-depends/

August 18, 2016 – Is that smartphone making students more or less connected with friends and family? Answer: it depends

This study is a bit of fun as it looks at how our smartphones makes us feel connected or disconnected. In this digital age, with phones at our finger tips, you would think that access to constant communication would make us feel closer to one another. But a new study by researchers at Kent State University shows that may not be the case. In fact, cell phone use might actually lead to feeling less socially connected, depending on your gender or cell phone habits.

Three researchers, Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Jian Li, Ph.D., from Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services surveyed 493 students, ranging in age from 18-29, to see whether cell phone use, including texting and talking, was associated with feeling socially connected to their parents and peers. The results show a significant difference between men and women.

Female students reported spending an average of 365 minutes per day using their cell phones, sending and receiving an average of 265 texts per day, and making and receiving six calls per day.

Male students reported spending less time on their phone (287 minutes), sending and receiving fewer texts (190), and making and receiving the same amount of calls as the female students.

For the women, the study found that talking on the phone was associated with feeling emotionally close with their parents. However, when it came to relationships with friends, texting was associated with feeling emotionally close.

For the men, the opposite holds true – daily calling and texting were not related in any way to feelings of emotional closeness with either parents or with peers.

Researchers also looked at problematic use, which is a recurrent craving to use a cell phone during inappropriate times – such as driving a car, or at night when you should be sleeping. For both the men and women, the study found that problematic cell phone use was negatively related to feelings of emotional closeness with parents and peers.

“In other words, the students in the study who tended to use their cell phones compulsively and at inappropriate times felt less socially connected to parents and peers than other students,” Lepp said.

According to Lepp, the study suggests that the phone may have more social value for women compared to men, and women may be better at using it to augment or complement existing social relationships.

As for problematic use, Lepp says given the cell phone’s many other functions, communicating with one another may no longer be the phone’s central purpose, which could be replacing more meaningful forms of relationship building, such as face-to-face communications for both genders.

 

Abstract of the study:

 

College students spend hours each day using their cell phones. A common motivation for this behavior is the maintenance of social relations. Yet depending on cell phone use behavior, cell phone use could potentially strengthen or weaken social relations. We investigated this possibility with a survey (N = 493) assessing students’ perceptions of important social relations (i.e., Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment) and various cell phone use behaviors. The relationship between cell phone use and Parent Attachment was modeled with three regression equations, one for each Parent Attachment subscale (i.e., communication, trust, alienation). These subscales were the criterion variables. Each regression equation contained the same predictor variables: total daily cell phone use, calling, texting, and problematic use. Anxiety and self-esteem were control variables. The relationship between cell phone use and Peer Attachment was modeled similarly. Regression equations were estimated simultaneously using the Seemingly Unrelated Regression technique. For males: calling, texting and total daily use were not related to parent or peer attachment; problematic use was negatively related to parent and peer attachment. For females: calling was positively related to parental attachment and texting to peer attachment; problematic use was negatively related to parent and peer attachment. Implications are discussed.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 6, 2016
9:42 pm
Jeff
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If Samsung just suffered it’s 'Worst Ever' Drop In Smartphone Sales because of their exploding phones, how come Chinese phone manufacturer Xiaomi’s shipments dropped 64% in two quarters last year in the complete absence of phone explosions?

I had to do the math, there. You'll see that the article below chops it up, first tells you about one quarter, then the second quarter, so they can hedge as best they can, water down the message, make it less impactful.

If Samsung just suffered it’s 'Worst Ever' Drop In Smartphone Sales because of their exploding phones, how come they reported a 40 percent decrease in net profit in the fourth quarter of 2015 in comparison with last year’s numbers, in the complete absence of phone explosions? To help you out, in January they cited “declining smartphone and mobile component sales.”

Having your flagship product recalled because of, er, explosion issues is certainly not going to increase sales. However I think it’s plain to see that the smartphone market is slowing, and stalling, and dropping, and rather significantly. I know...it’s another one of those things that I’m basically the only person on Planet Earth talking about. But as I regard them to be a deliberately-weaponized plague upon humanity, while I concede their convenience, I feel I must speak up about the matter.

My wife awakened this morning and immediately grabbed her SSmart phone, was lying in bed bathed in its blue glow when I came in from the kitchen. It’s the first thing she does in the morning, and the last thing she does at night, and she’s not at all unusual. She has trouble sleeping many nights. I won't go any deeper into it.

I don't know about you, but I’m sick of driving around and having every single driver I see in my rearview mirror looking down at Preciousss every three seconds.

But I think this time is passing, and quickly.

 

January 27, 2016 - Samsung's Earnings Drop Due to Low Smartphone Demand

Samsung Electronics reported a 40-percent decrease in net profit in the fourth quarter of 2015 in comparison with last year’s numbers, citing declining smartphone and mobile component sale 

 

March 2, 2016 – U.S. saw 6% overall drop in smartphone sales last quarter, research shows

 

August 16, 2016 – China - Xiaomi's Smartphone Shipments Drop 38% in Q2 - Fortune

Research cited in the report indicates that Xiaomi ( XIAOMI 0.00% )   had 10.5 million smartphone shipments in Q2, compared to 17.1 million shipments a year ago. Xiaomi’s smartphone sales in the first quarter had also slumped, decreasing by 26%.

 

November 17, 2016 – Gartner: Samsung Suffers 'Worst Ever' Drop In Smartphone Sales ...

After the initial recall of the Galaxy Note 7 back in September and its subsequent cancellation towards the beginning of October, Samsung announced a significant reduction in its revenue and profit forecasts.

Now, according to a new report by Gartner, the full consequences of the Galaxy Note 7 ordeal is finally starting to come to light.

Until today, the company’s worst drop in sales was back in 2014 and following the company’s release of its Galaxy S5 smartphone, which eventually led to a drop of 12.3-percent in its fourth quarter sales compared to the previous year. According to today’s report, though, the company has now seen a greater drop thanks to a decrease of 14.2-percent in Q3 2016 sales, compared to Q3 2015.

 

November 29, 2016 - Report: Third Quarter Smartphone Sales Dropped By 1.8% 

It has been reported by CCS Insight that the global mobile phone market in the third quarter of 2016 has declined by 1.8% from the previous year.

The drop in smartphone shipments has been blamed on weakness in developed markets where consumers are now less excited about the latest smartphones.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 7, 2016
6:31 pm
KSD22
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Hi Jeff,

Hope you're right about decline in cell phone use. I don't see it here in New York City roads and sidewalks. There's a decline I think in older generations but most young people don't have corded phones. When most of the pay phones were eliminated here, it reminded me of how street cars (the primary mode of public transportation) were rounded up and automobiles hit the road. Wikipedia calls it a conspiracy and blames the Great Depression for decline in street car lines.

This past Monday, I interviewed a cyberpsychologist who wrote about how technology changes human behavior. Its posted at http://inothernewsradio.com/po.....er-5-2016/

Wondering about how the rising female death rate factors in to cyber effect.

Geoff

December 7, 2016
9:30 pm
Jeff
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Re: "I don't see it"

(Darth Vader voice): “Search your heart, you know it to be true!”

 

October 26, 2016 - Why flip phones might rise and conquer the world

If things haven't been strange enough this year, now comes this bombshell: Apple on Tuesday reported its first annual drop in sales in more than a decade.

What is going on?

USA Today reported that Apple's fiscal year 2016 revenue of $215.6 billion declined 8 percent from the previous fiscal year. It's the first drop for Apple since 2001, shortly before the release of the iPod.

Blame softening iPhone sales.

Meanwhile, flip phones — yes, flip phones — are making a comeback.

What is going on?

Here are five reasons why flip phones might rise and conquer the world:

  1. Flip phones don't reveal to the room the candid text you don't want your co-workers (i.e. bosses) to see. We're talking to you, nearly everyone, who places the smartphone face down on the conference room table.
  2. Frustration with Facebook leads to a hardware revolt.
  3. Turns out we actually do want to hear what people on the other end of the line are saying.
  4. Our parents are upgrading their phones. Their flip phones.
  5. Colts quarterback Andrew Luck uses a flip phone, and we want to be cool like Andrew Luck.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 8, 2016
4:49 pm
Jeff
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Anytime the folks in charge publish good news, it’s terse, and short, and tight-lipped. And, when they’re lying about something, it’s long, and tortuous. Like you’ll see below in the article about the U.S. life expectancy declining for the first time since 1993.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why a paragraph below reads: “ ‘This is unusual, and we don’t know what happened,’ said Jiaquan Xu, an epidemiologist and lead author of the study. “So many leading causes of death increased.”

The paragraph right before that one reads “Experts cautioned against interpreting too much from a single year of data; the numbers could reverse themselves next year, they said.”

That’s called “slow-playing” or “stonewalling” or “fighting a desperate rearguard action that will soon turn to rout.

One of those meme-variants is "unexpected". That's why the article below tells of "the unexpected jump in mortality rates among white middle-aged Americans."

Clues in the article below about the “mystery” we’re working on…one of the biggest, and I’m going to bold it: “that the diseases behind the lower life expectancy occur in middle age or younger.”

So, what are middle age and younger people doing or consuming more chronically than older people?

The number of unintentional injuries — which include overdoses from drugs, alcohol and other chemicals, as well as motor vehicle crashes and other accidents climbed to more than 146,000 in 2015 from slightly more than 136,000 in 2014.”

Can you see how they put motor vehicle crashes and other accidents at the very end? That’s called “burying” it. And they use “other accidents” to cover up specific stats that include pedestrians and cyclists being struck by cars – which has increased, as “distracted” driving increases, to use the pandered propaganda term.

And, can you see how they listed the vehicle crashes and ‘other accidents’ numbers, but did not provide you with a percentage, as doing so would be more impactful, and damage their clear mission to hedge and obfuscate in this case? It’s a 7.3% increase.

Anyway, right after they at last cough up “vehicle crashes and other accidents”, they finish with this sentence, to wipe away your memory of crashes and accidents:

Public health authorities have been grappling with an epidemic of overdoses from prescription narcotics, heroin and fentanyl in recent years. Xu said overdose statistics were not yet ready to be released to the public.”

He’s stonewalling because they’re exaggerating it/moving to out-and-out lying about it. Addiction rates and drug use are dropping, just as alcohol use is dropping, and that’s copiously documented in my “Positive Changes Are Occurring” thread here on this forum. If he releases the figures the “overdose epidemic!” confidence game is going to collapse, which is why “overdose statistics were not yet ready to be released to the public.

Deaths from suicide, the 10th-leading cause of death in the United States, rose to 44,193 from 42,773 in 2014.

Can you see how, in that preceding paragraph, they listed the numbers, but did not provide you with a percentage, as doing so would be more impactful, and damage their clear mission to hedge and obfuscate in this case? It’s a 3.2% increase.

Several experts pointed out that other Western nations are not seeing similar rises in mortality, suggesting an urgency to determine what is unique about health, health care and socioeconomic conditions in the United States.”

Can you see how they lied baldfacedly? In that increasing suicide rates and overall mortality are, indeed being seen in other “Western” nations, as well. The effort is always to compartmentalize, to take the view off the larger phenomenon. I urge the reader to go back in this thread and review the data compiled to this point. Oh, and who are “several experts”? That’s made up bullshit, or they’d be credited. It’s a technique used to bewilder and steer the herd.

“Infant mortality rose slightly, according to the report, but the difference was not considered statistically significant.”

Here’s a story on the subject of rising infant mortality from less than a month ago: “Infant mortality rates increase across Ohio. Overall, infant mortality rates in Ohio have been trending downward over time, but a new report from the Ohio Department of Health showed a 5% increase from 955 in 2014 to 1,005 in 2015. The uptick indicates 2014 may have just been an anomaly – it was the first year infant deaths dropped below 1,000 since records began in 1939.This thread documents the increase in infant mortality.”

5%! And the folks in charge say that’s “statistically insignificant”, because they’re lying to you about basically everything, including statistical significance. You’ll note that the repugnant word “uptick” is used. It means “a small increase.” A 5% increase in mortality is not “small”, nor is it “statistically insignificant.” Oh, and you can see that “2014 may have just been an anomaly” maps exactly against “Experts cautioned against interpreting too much from a single year of data; the numbers could reverse themselves next year”, above.

So whatever it is, it’s causing “a panoply of worsening health problems.” It’s causing “increases in virtually every cause of death.”

It’s causing physical, biological damage across all disease strata. And it’s also causing behavioral dysfunction, e.g. ‘vehicle crashes and other accidents’.

It's "across the board". As if it were caused by, you know, "something in the air."

And it’s occurring moreso among the middle aged, and the young.

So, what are the middle aged and younger people doing or consuming more chronically than older people?

I don’t think this is very difficult.

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/us-life-expectancy-declines-for-the-first-time-since-1993/2016/12/07/7dcdc7b4-bc93-11e6-91ee-1adddfe36cbe_story.html?utm_term=.679aaf32a05c

U.S. life expectancy declines for the first time since 1993

December 8, 2016

For the first time in more than two decades, life expectancy for Americans declined last year — a troubling development linked to a panoply of worsening health problems in the United States.

Rising fatalities from heart disease and stroke, diabetes, drug overdoses, accidents and other conditions caused the lower life expectancy revealed in a report released Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics. In all, death rates rose for eight of the top 10 leading causes of death.

“I think we should be very concerned,” said Princeton economist Anne Case, who called for thorough research on the increase in deaths from heart disease, the No. 1 killer in the United States. This is singular. This doesn’t happen.”

A year ago, research by Case and Angus Deaton, also an economist at Princeton, brought worldwide attention to the unexpected jump in mortality rates among white middle-aged Americans. That trend was blamed on what are sometimes called diseases of despair: overdoses, alcoholism and suicide. The new report raises the possibility that major illnesses may be eroding prospects for an even wider group of Americans.

Its findings show increases in “virtually every cause of death. It’s all ages,” said David Weir, director of the health and retirement study at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Over the past five years, he noted, improvements in death rates were among the smallest of the past four decades. “There’s this just across-the-board [phenomenon] of not doing very well in the United States.”

Overall, life expectancy fell by one-tenth of a year, from 78.9 in 2014 to 78.8 in 2015, according to the latest data. The last time U.S. life expectancy at birth declined was in 1993, when it dropped from 75.6 to 75.4, according to World Bank data.

The overall death rate rose 1.2 percent in 2015, its first uptick since 1999. More than 2.7 million people died, about 45 percent of them from heart disease or cancer.

Experts cautioned against interpreting too much from a single year of data; the numbers could reverse themselves next year, they said.

“This is unusual, and we don’t know what happened,” said Jiaquan Xu, an epidemiologist and lead author of the study. “So many leading causes of death increased.”

The report’s lone bright spot was a drop in the death rate from cancer, probably because fewer people are smoking, the disease is being detected earlier and new treatments have been developed recently, experts said.

According to the new report, males could expect to live 76.3 years at birth last year, down from 76.5 in 2014. Females could expect to live to 81.2 years, down from 81.3 the previous year.

Life expectancy at age 65 did not fall, another indication that the diseases behind the lower life expectancy occur in middle age or younger. At 65, men can expect to live 18 more years, while women survive an average of 20.6 more years, the data shows. Infant mortality rose slightly, according to the report, but the difference was not considered statistically significant.

Heart disease was responsible for more than 633,000 deaths in 2015, up from a little more than 614,000 the previous year. Cancer killed more than 595,000 people.

“We’re seeing the ramifications of the increase in obesity,” said Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “And we’re seeing that in an increase in heart disease.”

The number of unintentional injuries — which include overdoses from drugs, alcohol and other chemicals, as well as motor vehicle crashes and other accidents — climbed to more than 146,000 in 2015 from slightly more than 136,000 in 2014. Public health authorities have been grappling with an epidemic of overdoses from prescription narcotics, heroin and fentanyl in recent years. Xu said overdose statistics were not yet ready to be released to the public.

Deaths from suicide, the 10th-leading cause of death in the United States, rose to 44,193 from 42,773 in 2014.

Several experts pointed out that other Western nations are not seeing similar rises in mortality, suggesting an urgency to determine what is unique about health, health care and socioeconomic conditions in the United States.

“Mortality rates in middle age have totally flat­lined in the U.S. for people in their 30s and 40s and 50s, or have been increasing,” Case said. “What we really need to do is find out why we have stopped making progress against heart disease. And I don’t have the answer to that.”

Meara noted that more people need better health care but that “the health-care system is only a part of health.” Income inequality, nutrition differences and lingering unemployment all need to be addressed, she said.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 8, 2016
8:07 pm
Jeff
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December 22, 2007
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'And I waited. Until that night when he left this house. He said and did things then that filled me with a fear that no words of Saruman could allay. I knew at last that something dark and deadly was at work. And I have spent most of the years since then in finding out the truth of it.'

 'There wasn't any permanent harm done, was there?' asked Frodo anxiously....

 'He felt better at once,' said Gandalf.... 'Soft as butter [hobbits] can be, and yet sometimes as tough as old tree-roots. I think it likely that some would resist the Rings far longer than most of the Wise would believe. I don't think you need worry about Bilbo.”

 

J.R.R. Tolkein, from “The Fellowship of the Ring”

 

 

alien.jpg

 PHone-ice.jpg

 Borg.jpg

 

 

 

 

The first article below is headlined “Why My Flip Phone Is Better Than Your Smartphone”

It has some interesting tidbits. The author first says “for one reason, it’s a clunky embarrassment, making forgetting it in a cab more difficult.” Then later in the article they say “My beautiful flip phone is easier to remember.”

I think that she is touching on the bizarre psychology connected with the device, or, more terrifyingly, still, the spiritual link between the device and the human utilizing it. The soul connection.

I can tell you that my wife “forgets” her SSmart phone a lot, and I’ve always chalked it up to, at best, the subconscious trying to rid itself of the device, which has attached itself to the user's face like the crablike baby monsters in the movie “Alien”.

I think this author started with “clunky embarrassment” because that’s something they had to struggle through when they broke away from it. And then she transformed to where she viewed it as "beautiful".

I found this quote to be funny, accurate and revealing: “As a craven addict to the lukewarm bath of jealousy and narcissism that is social media, it’s nice to be forcefully disconnected when I’m out of the house.”

Craven: contemptibly lacking in courage; cowardly.

Addict: a person who is addicted to an activity, habit, or substance; to habituate or abandon (oneself) to something compulsively or obsessively

while it’s nice not being able to look at facebook while I’m waiting in line at the bank or a coffee shop, I don’t want to make it seem like I’ve achieved some sort of transcendental bliss by giving up touching a glass screen with my thumb. My mind is still the modern, muddled mess of doubts and anxiety.”

I’m sorry, but my mind is not a modern, muddled mess of doubts and anxiety, and I don’t think anyone’s should be. And we know that there’s a rapidly-rising suicide rate, particularly among women. So, just WHAT is it that is creating a modern, muddled mess of doubts and anxiety and rapidly rising suicide rates? And mortality rates? And accident rates?

The other (female) featured below said “After asking the Verizon representative approximately 200 questions on chat, I felt confident in officially making the switch. It was actually pretty easy.”

Two…hundred…questions. That’s one fearful addict.

Already, I noticed how little I was texting my family and friends. It was weird. I fell asleep at 10 p.m. because there was no one to talk to and no social to look at. That was a perk, I guess.”

Sounds like the first gal escaped, and the other one was already backsliding. Her thread went dead after that.

The foldable iPhone mentioned at bottom is a ruse, a canard – in that it’s still web-enabled, Preciousss. But, to me, the positioning of the foldable phone on the forefront of fashion is a ‘tell’, an indication that the flip phone wave is jacking up.

Remember, when the school of fish, the flock of birds turns, they do so apparently as one.

And drinking three martini’s a day at lunch and owning slaves both used to be socially acceptable, the height of fashion.

We’re going to leave this shit behind like, well, a bad habit.

 

April 13, 2016 – Why My Flip Phone Is Better Than Your Smartphone

Two months into this flip phone life, and I’m glad things worked out the way they did. I really like my flip phone.

For one reason, it’s a clunky embarrassment, making forgetting it in a cab more difficult. Secondly, I actually use it as a phone. I always found using my smartphone as a phone to be arduous. I found my arm going numb due to its weight during lengthy calls. More frequently, the side of my face would end a call without my knowledge.

-

As a craven addict to the lukewarm bath of jealousy and narcissism that is social media, it’s nice to be forcefully disconnected when I’m out of the house.

-

My beautiful flip phone is easier to remember, lighter, and more enjoyable to use as an actual phone, and while it’s nice not being able to look at facebook while I’m waiting in line at the bank or a coffee shop, I don’t want to make it seem like I’ve achieved some sort of transcendental bliss by giving up touching a glass screen with my thumb. My mind is still the modern, muddled mess of doubts and anxiety.

-

Even stranger than that has been people’s reactions to seeing my flip phone. The most common one is mockery – an incredulous “that’s your phone?”, as if I pulled out a can with a string attached that stretched out of the room – followed by an insinuation that I’m a drug dealer and that it’s my burner. Thanks for nothing, David Simon.

-

That’s why I’ll continue to use my flip phone. It’s a pebble in the shoe of the future. A reminder that there are still people who exist outside the giddy, frictionless highway of convenience that an iPHone provides access to.

And mostly I’ll keep using it because it’s like 25 bucks a month.

 

September 8, 2016 – It's 2016 and Samsung just announced a flip phone - Digital Trends

 

September 20, 2016 – Then I started to wonder: What if I went back to a flip phone? Could I actually do it, or would my work suffer? I work in social media, and I use my iPhone for everything, both professionally and personally. I snap, tweet, post on Instagram, and most importantly, email all damn day. What would happen when I was sent an urgent email? Or if there was something that I just had to snap or post?

After having no luck finding an old phone from my coworkers, I grabbed a pink Motorola Razr from eBay. My plan: For seven days, I’d go back to using a Razr. No smartphone allowed. I could use my computer for social media at work, but for any situation in which I’d normally use my phone, I’d now be using this early 2000s relic.

I sent an email to my immediate team and let them know about this experiment… And I added that if they needed to reach me urgently, they’d need to text me. Then I got started.

-

After asking the Verizon representative approximately 200 questions on chat, I felt confident in officially making the switch. It was actually pretty easy.

-

Already, I noticed how little I was texting my family and friends. It was weird. I fell asleep at 10 p.m. because there was no one to talk to and no social to look at. That was a perk, I guess.

 

November 22, 2016 – Apple once again hints at a foldable iPhone

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"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 8, 2016
9:00 pm
Jeff
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andrew-luck-colts-new-flip-phone.jpg

 

 

 

 

Not only does Andrew Luck still use a flip phone, he just got a new one

August 25, 2016

Andrew Luck has known that his cell phone is outdated for at least four years. His affinity for the flip phone is well-documented and it doesn’t look like he’ll be upgrading any time soon, even though he’s now the highest-paid player in NFL history.

Not only is Luck sticking with 2006’s hottest technology, he just bought a new flip phone.

What you can’t see there is Luck’s hip holster for his sweet new phone.

“It has text. I can text and call. What else do you need?” Luck told USA Today last month. “And I have an iPad. I’m not a Luddite.”

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 8, 2016
10:10 pm
KSD22
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Re: Re: I dont see it

 

I live amid a high demographic
of "smart" phone users,
thanks for posting the flip phone news,the first of seen of it.

Geoff

December 10, 2016
3:24 pm
Gare
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SMART METERS & EMF RADIATION ➜ The Health Crisis Of Our Time!

 

Trying to post this quick to see if I'm still blocked from posting.  

December 20, 2016
3:13 pm
Jeff
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Gare, thanks for that addition. It must be noted that, while I believe that the SSmart phone is one of the major Death Energy Delivery vehicles currently deployed against humanity, it is only one of many, which include televisions, SSmart meters, those weird new tall lightpoles along all our highways, and of course the infrastructure that many still mistakenly presume only carries cell phone traffic and weather radar data.

 

The title of the article below is “California’s birth rate hits record low following job, housing woes.” Where “job, housing woes” is the plausible-deniability excuse designed to keep your eye off the larger trend. It’s called “compartmentalization”…notice that they talk about California, but take care not to map it against similar trends in the wider world.

The soft word “dipped” is used to describe the drop, implying helpfully that it will pop right back up again.

They manage to mention this larger, national trend, the one supporting their plausible-deniability excuse:

The move toward smaller families is a national trend that’s played out for at least a decade as women put off having children until later in life.”

Yet they make not mention of nationally and globally dropping birth rates, or nationally and globally rising mortality rates. Don’t you think that’s curious?

You'll also notice that they mention that the birth rate is at a record low, and tell you the most recent numbers of births and deaths, but carefully avoid printing the number of births and deaths last year, or the percentage of the drop, year to year. These are careful, deliberate tactics, used by what are variously called reporters, propagandists, spin doctors and neurolinquistic programmers.

Also please notice that the quote about last year’s births and deaths is sandwiched between two other “numbers” quotes:

“California had 39.4 million residents as of June 30, up 0.75 percent year-to-year.

 The state recorded 489,000 births and 264,000 deaths in the last fiscal year.

 70,000 more people moved into California than moved out of the state in the last fiscal year.”

 That’s done deliberately, so your brain said “lists of numbers…BORE-ing”, and moves past them, versus focusing in on them: All careful, careful wordsmithing.

 

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/.....oug.reddit

 

California’s birth rate hits record low following job, housing woes

December 19, 2016

As California’s population grew to 39.4 million this year, the birth rate dipped to an all-time low, according to data released Monday — a decline that some say could dent future economic growth and prosperity.

The move toward smaller families is a national trend that’s played out for at least a decade as women put off having children until later in life. In California, the recession of the late 2000s, a lingering economic recovery and the state’s exorbitant real estate market have created fresh obstacles for young couples looking to settle down.

“It’s not like Millennials are all of a sudden different,” said Dowell Myers, a demographer at the University of Southern California’s School of Public Policy. “What’s different is they came of age at a really bad time. First, they lose their job opportunities. Second, they’ve been gridlocked by the shortage of housing.

“It’s just been harder to get things in place before having kids,” Myers said.

The result for California was just 489,000 babies born between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 — or 12.4 births for every 1,000 people, according to the state Department of Finance. The rate surpassed the previous record low of 12.6 births for every 1,000 people set in 1933, during the throes of the Great Depression.

California’s small northern counties, which have long struggled to attract jobs and young families, logged the lowest birth rates. But wealthier coastal spots, including the Bay Area and Central Coast, weren’t far behind.

Though the state numbers don’t tease out birth rates by ethnicity, U.S. Census figures suggest the trend holds among virtually all groups.

The low birth rate in California helped prolong the state’s decade-long trend of minimal population growth. The 0.75-percent increase between July of 2015 and 2016 marks 12 consecutive years without a bump above 1 percent. That’s a far cry from last century’s growth rates, which at times reached 3 percent or more a year.

In the ’70s and ’80s, we were pretty much a new state, with plenty of opportunity and open land, and many people came here,” said Walter Schwarm, a demographer with the Department of Finance. “Now, we look like a state that isn’t at that point anymore. We’re a mature state.”

The new population figures show that migration in the last fiscal year to California — while relatively low by historical standards — was still higher than during the late 2000s, when the recession chased more people away than it drew here. About 70,000 more people moved into the state than out of it.

Public policy experts say expanding birth and migration rates are a key component of economic growth.

“These are your future workers, taxpayers and home buyers. It’s your future for the next 20 years,” Myers said. “And we’re not getting them.”

At a glance

California had 39.4 million residents as of June 30, up 0.75 percent year-to-year.

The state recorded 489,000 births and 264,000 deaths in the last fiscal year.

70,000 more people moved into California than moved out of the state in the last fiscal year.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 21, 2016
6:11 pm
Jeff
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People have started to move away from "antidepressants", because they know that, A: they don't work, and, B: they're bad for you.

If you're reading this thread, you're aware of skyrocketing suicide rates.

You'll see a headline below that says "Does drop in antidepressant use correlate with spike in suicides?" There, the jarring, repugnant meme word "spike" is used, which implies it's shot up, but will shoot right back down again, forming a "spike" on the graph.

The inconvenient truth that "SSRI Antidepressants Put Patients at Clear Risk of Suicide" is something the "spike in suicides" propagandist is choosing to deny, deny, deny.

The tactics are obvious and repetitive, and in the future, someone - probably an elementary school student - is going to look at these threads and say "I can't believe this guy talked about this stuff out in the open for literally years without everyone knowing about it."

But it's going to, and they will.

 

Apr 22, 2016 - Does drop in antidepressant use correlate with spike in suicides?

June 8, 2016 – Study: Most Antidepressants Don't Work on Kids or Teens

Jun 30, 2016 - SSRI Antidepressants Put Patients at Clear Risk of Suicide

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 21, 2016
8:07 pm
Jeff
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The article below tell us that “The United States population this year showed the slowest growth since the Great Depression.”

And they tell us that’s because of “an increase in deaths among baby boomers and a slowdown in births among younger generations.”

An increase in deaths. That’s kind of an elementary-school way to put it, don’t you think? And the article provides no further expansion on just what, exactly, that means. And no mention of globally-increasing mortality rates and how they map against similar rates in the U.S.

“A slowdown in births” is just as juvenile, and implies it will speed right up again. It could be people are having less kids because they're choosing to. It could also be that people are trying to have kids at the same rate and are having less success in doing so. That latter possibility not mentioned or considered. And the article certainly doesn't talk about rapidly-increasing maternal mortality.

The headline gives you the most kindergarten way to compartmentalize it of all: “Americans aren't having as many kids.”

See, it’s Americans. That puts it in a compartment, stops you from looking at the broader trend.

 

Americans aren't having as many kids: 8 states post population loss

December 21, 2016

The United States population this year showed the slowest growth since the Great Depression, and would have been even slower had it not been for an increase in immigrants, according to the 2016 U.S. Census Bureau report.

Nationally, the U.S. population grew only by 0.7% to 323.1 million. That slowdown is due to an increase in deaths among baby boomers and a slowdown in births among younger generations, resulting in eight states losing overall population during the year.

The only saving grace for many communities, especially in the northeast, was immigration. In 34 states, international arrivals outpaced domestic arrivals (people who move from one state to another). Three states — Maryland, Massachusetts and Rhode Island — would have lost population if not for international arrivals. And New York's loss of 1,894 people in 2016 could have been staggering without the 118,478 foreigners who moved to the state.

Overall, the nearly 1 million immigrants who entered the country in 2016 were down from previous years, but still made up 45% of the nation's population growth. That figure could drop considerably under President-elect Donald Trump, who vowed to slow down legal and illegal immigration under his administration starting next month.

"The population is aging, the baby boomers are aging, but international migration has been fairly consistent," said Randy Capps, director of research for U.S. programs at the non-partisan Migration Policy Institute. "If we really did curtail immigration substantially, that would really slow population growth quite a bit."

The increase in the immigrant population came almost entirely through the legal immigration system. The federal government grants about 1 million green cards a year, and the immigrant population in the U.S. grew by nearly 1 million, according to the Census data. That backs up data from the Pew Research Center that has reported the number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. has been flat, and starting to decline, over the past six years.

Hispanic growth rate in U.S. lowest on record

Illinois lost more people than any other state (37,508), while West Virginia saw the biggest percentage drop (-0.54%). The other states that lost people were Connecticut, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Wyoming. The big losses in the northeast, according to Capps, are a result of retirees moving south and an aging population that can't keep up with new births.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

December 22, 2016
2:32 pm
Jeff
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In the article below, you'll read "The study of more than 1,000 participants, mostly women, says that "regular use of social networking such as Facebook can negatively affect your emotional well-being and satisfaction with life".

While the behavioral drivers of that downward trend are well documented in the article, there's no mention as to what the physical impact is, if any, of having your face and brain beamed by the carrier wave holding the Facebook images.

A quick analysis of the emotional well being and life satisfaction of V8Buick forum users, cross referenced against this FB data, would be instructive.

What, exactly, is going on within the milieu we're discussing in this thread will become very clear with a modicum of honest research.

Not that it's not becoming pretty clear already - to me, that is.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/educat.....n-38392802

 

Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study

December 22, 2016

Too much Facebook browsing at Christmas - and seeing all those "perfect" families and holiday photos - is more likely to make you miserable than festive, research suggests.

A University of Copenhagen study suggests excessive use of social media can create feelings of envy.

It particularly warns about the negative impact of "lurking" on social media without connecting with anyone.

The study suggests taking a break from using social media.

The study of more than 1,000 participants, mostly women, says that "regular use of social networking such as Facebook can negatively affect your emotional well-being and satisfaction with life".

'Unrealistic social comparisons'

Researchers warn of envy and a "deterioration of mood" from spending too long looking at other people's social media stories, induced by "unrealistic social comparisons".

If this suggests a picture of long irritable hours over a screen, depressed by the boasts and posts of others, then the researchers say that it does not need to be this way.

Actively engaging in conversation and connecting with people on social media seems to be a much more positive experience, suggests the study, published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behaviour and Social Networking.

This seems to be much less gloomy than "passive" users who spend too long "lurking" on social networking websites without getting involved.

Another approach to improve well-being, says the study, is to stop using social media altogether for a week.

That's if you can resist the temptation to look at all those unbearably smug pictures of skiing holidays...

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

January 3, 2017
9:58 pm
Jeff
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“Doublethink is the acceptance of or mental capacity to accept contrary opinions or beliefs at the same time, especially as a result of political indoctrination.”

George Orwell, from “1984

 

October 16, 2013 - A downside to an up economy? Mortality rates increase in better times

December 9, 2016 – Economic stress played role in increasing US death rate

 

 

I really shouldn't have to go on after those two preceding quotes, but...

 

October 16, 2013 - A downside to an up economy? Mortality rates increase in better times

 

August 25, 2016 – Task Force Explores Why Texas Had Higher Pregnancy Death Rates ...

A study published this month has found that maternal mortality rates doubled in Texas between 2011 ... "Some of the increase in recent years may be related to better reporting. ....

 

December 8, 2016 – Heart disease, stroke death rates increase following decades of decline...

 

December 9, 2016 – Economic stress played role in increasing US death rate - Science Daily

 

December 13, 2016 - Maternal Mortality Increase Explained by Coding Changes? - Medscape

 

January 3, 2017 - Maternal mortality rate on rise in Banke | The Himalayan Times

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

January 4, 2017
6:55 pm
Jeff
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December 2, 2016 – U.K. - The rate of suicides among women has increased to its highest level in a decade

Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that 6,188 people in the UK intentionally took their own lives in 2015, up from 6,122 in 2014.

This increase was driven by a rise in deaths by suicide among women with the rate rising from 5.2 to 5.4 per 100,000 people.

For both genders the 45-59 age group had the highest rate of suicide for any age group

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

January 17, 2017
8:15 pm
Jeff
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female data point:

 

June 12, 2012 – Constant Internet access 'causes sleep disorders and depression with late night users most likely to suffer'

People who make heavy use of mobile phones and computers run a greater risk of sleep disturbances, stress and symptoms of mental health

Put together, the results showed a clear link between heavy computer and mobile phone use and disturbed sleep.

Spending long hours in front of the computer was associated with depression in women but not in men. The researchers from the University of Gothenburg suspect this may be to do with differences in the way the sexes use technology.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

January 18, 2017
10:32 pm
Jeff
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You’ll see below that the maternal mortality rate is on the rise in most U.S. States.

Why is it on the rise in the U.S.?

Why did the U.K. just see the biggest absolute and relative increase in mortality in 40 years?

Taking the population as a whole, the increase in the age-standardised death rate from 2014 to 2015 in the U.K. was 5%. Whereas the overall mortality rate dropped 12% in the U.K. from 2005-2015, and dropped 25% from 1994-2015. What was it that stopped this significant, long-term drop, and turned it into the biggest increase in 40 years?

An article below says “For those aged 85+ the increase on the year was 6.7% (male) and 9.5% (female). For those aged 75-84 the increases were 2.8% (male) and 2.0% (female); and for the 65-74 age bracket 3.5% (male) and 6.0% (female).”

In that data, I’m seeing females leading males, overall, in terms of the increase in mortality.

And I’m not seeing data for the younger age groups that have really been bingeing on technology, which is my lead suspect in “what’s driving the increase?”

Another bell-ringer, from Scotland: “For females there was also a 45% increase (again from 1994-2015) in death from ‘chronic obstructive pulmonary disease’.” No mention of males, and COPD. 45% is a staggeringly huge increase.

I’m seeing that, overall, “the Cancer death rate has dropped 25 percent since 1991 peak”, but that “Gynecological Cancer Mortality Rates for Women Increases.” Just another “increasing female mortality” data point, among a larger overall decline, for the moment.

If “the Cancer death rate has dropped 25 percent since 1991 peak”, then why was there an increase in breast cancer mortality in women aged 20-49 years in Brazil from from 1996 to 2013? And why did women 50-69 years of age in Brazil NOT see an increase during that same time period?

The tortuous academic article I pulled the data from took care not to mention overall percentage increases. This is the statistic-speak: “For the trend analysis, the polynomial regression model was used, and a significant trend was considered when the estimated model obtained a p value <0.05.”

So “an increase in breast cancer mortality in women aged 20-49 years, but not 50-69 years” and “a significant trend.”

Finishing out the Brazil analysis, “it was observed that the highest rates (of mortality increase) were found in the last three years,”

Why women of that certain age group, and why in the last three years (2010-2013)? My surmise would be that’s because the damage is cumulative, and dose dependent, and that we’re seeing it come out the tailpipe, now, after years of bingeing on higher and higher doses of the driver of the damage. With women of that specific age group doing the most bingeing.

If I’m correct, these numbers are going to continue to climb, and I won’t be the only person on Earth discussing it for very much longer.

 

August 8, 2016 – Maternal Mortality Rates on the Rise in Most US States - Medscape

 

January 3, 2017 – World Death Rate Holding Steady At 100 Percent - The Onion

 

January 3, 2017 – There was a tendency of increased mortality from breast cancer in Brazilian women (average increase of 0.18 per year; p <0.001), with regional differences, particularly in the age group 20–49 years (0.07 per year; p <0.001). The age group 50–69 years remained constant but had high average rates (37.14).

In 1996, the mortality rate from breast cancer in Brazil was 12.1, rising to 15.7 in 2013. (That’s a 30% increase in 17 years, within a specific age group. They wouldn’t print it, I had to do the math – ed)

Regarding age, in Brazil, there was a trend (from 1996 to 2013) of increased mortality from breast cancer in women 20–49 years. The age group 50–69 years remained constant, but with high average rates. All of the regions showed an increasing trend in women 20–49 years, with the largest increase in the Northeast (0.19, r2 = 0.97) and higher average rates in the Southeast and South (7.64 and 7.40, respectively).

-

After visual inspection, it was observed that the highest rates were found in the last three years,

 

January 4, 2017 – Cuba reduces infant mortality rate to 4.3 in 2016 - ACN

 

January 5, 2017 - Cancer death rate has dropped 25 percent since 1991 peak

 

January 8, 2017 – ZIMBABWE's child mortality rate has declined from 75 to 69 deaths per 1 000 live births between 2014 and 2015 (That’s an 8% decrease, which they wouldn’t print – I had to do the math – ed)

 

January 10, 2017 - Gynecological Cancer Mortality Rates for Women Increases.

 

January 11, 2017 – Why are Scotland's mortality rates rising?

In a recent article Will Hutton produced some data showing that, in his words: - ‘The British are in the midst of a critical health epidemic’. He based this very strong statement on data which showed not only a major jump in the number of deaths recorded in the UK in the 12 months to June 2016 (the biggest absolute and relative amount since 1940) but also that this increase was spread across age groups. There had been increases for all age groups from 55-74 upwards.

A different picture emerges when looking at the very latest available data. In 2015 male mortality rates were higher than in 2014 for each of the five highest age bands – 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+. For females this was the case in four of the five age bands, not for those aged 55-64 where there was another small reduction.

These increases were of some substance. For those aged 85+ the increase on the year was 6.7% (male) and 9.5% (female). For those aged 75-84 the increases were 2.8% (male) and 2.0% (female); and for the 65-74 age bracket 3.5% (male) and 6.0% (female).

Taking the population as a whole, the increase in the age-standardised death rate from 2014 to 2015 was 5%. By way of comparison the reduction from 2005-2015 was 12% and from 1994-2015 25%. For males the equivalent figures are +5%; -15%; and -31%; for females +6%; -11%; and -21%. In other words the increase in mortality rates is roughly similar for both genders, and the change in trend more significant for males than females.

-

For females there was also a 45% increase (again from 1994-2015) in death from ‘chronic obstructive pulmonary disease’.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

January 23, 2017
9:00 pm
Jeff
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“Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them.”

George Orwell, from “1984

 

February 22, 2008 – Deflating the Bogus Insomnia “Epidemic”

June 25, 2013 – Insomnia declared 'public health epidemic' by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

June 12, 2015 – Have insomnia? Better night's sleep all in your head

June 8, 2016 – The Modern Sleeplessness Epidemic That Isn't -- nymag.com

August 17, 2016 - Is our fear of insomnia what's actually keeping us up at night?

 

 

Those five quotes above demonstrate that the folks in charge are lying to you about basically everything, including insomnia.

Great story from this past weekend...I’m helping my parents move, and my nephew and his girlfriend (both 21 years old) are helping, also. At some point, my phone rings, and I pull out my (flip) phone, say excuse me, and turn aside to take the call. The girlfriend gets wide-eyed and says "The FLIP phone! Who ARE you?"

As I pressed the button to pick up the call I smiled wryly and replied "I'm Jeff Miller." Later realizing that the Super Awesome-o reply would have been "no one of consequence" (also while smiling wryly). That being Westley from "the Princess Bride", of course.

We all had a quick convo about the subject. I said "it's a great lifestyle - you should consider it - we all have plenty of online access, it doesn't need to extend to your phone." The girlfriend replied "yeah, in our generation, it's uncool to look at your phone all the time. That's something parents do. We want to go back to the old phones." Which I thought was tremendously inspiring. We're already leaving it behind, do you see?

I closed and got a big laugh by saying "the number one quarterback in the NFL has a flip phone. And don't forget about Jason Bourne."

The nephew I mentioned is having trouble with insomnia, as is my wife, as is a large chunk of our population, as I’ve tried to document in the reportage below.

The 1920 “Journal of the American Medical Association” nugget that kicks it off is very interesting to me, in that it documents Encephalitis, an acute inflammation of the brain, as the driver behind insomnia. That technology in general, and Ssmart phone in particular might engender inflammation of the brain certainly doesn’t sound like a wild premise to me, but for now it’s just another data point in this developing investigation.

One of the articles, from five days ago, helpfully elucidates that “There is an epidemic of women who simply cannot sleep at night” (italics mine), but then lays down clouds of chaff, namely “Though I manage to drop off within the hour, come about 1.30am I’ll be awake again, due to either a hot flush or a nightmare — which I’ve read can also be hormone related.”

I’ve read”, ah, mirth. Where did you read it, pray? Whenever they don’t cite the source, you know it’s bullshit, a plausible deniability trial-balloon designed to keep your eyes off the bigger picture.

51% of the population are women. Only a subset of those 51% are in “mid-life”, and afflicted with “hormonal issues.” If nightmares are “hormone related”, then how can the sentence, below, “just one in ten agreed with the statement: "I would describe my dreams as pleasant" be true?

Well, it IS true…it’s just the ruse that “hormonal issues” at “mid life” are what’s driving the nightmares that’s false.

You can see in that nightmare quote how they diabolically inverted it: “90% reported nightmares” becomes “just one in ten agreed with the statement: "I would describe my dreams as pleasant."

Twisting, spinning, bobbing, weaving, Preciousss.

Here it is again, from 2012: “One-in-three Britons now suffer sleep problems, and hormonal issues mean women are plagued by insomnia more than men.”

No, sorry, the other variable of the mid-life women is their PHONE ADDICTION, their facebook addiction, their texting addiction.

But don’t take my word for it, ask my nephew’s girlfriend:

"yeah, in our generation, it's uncool to look at your phone all the time. That's something parents do. We want to go back to the old phones."

 

 

1920 – The Journal of the American Medical Association

From our observation of these cases we are convinced that persistent insomnia is a fairly common sequel of acute epidemic (lethargic) encephalitis in children.

(Encephalitis is an acute inflammation of the brain – ed)

 

September 30, 2005 – Insomnia in women: an overlooked epidemic? - NCBI

 

February 22, 2008 – Deflating the Bogus Insomnia “Epidemic” | DiscoverMagazine.com

 

May 13, 2010 – Trouble sleeping? Maybe it's your iPad

 

March 7, 2011 - Gadgets lead to insomnia epidemic - TG Daily

 

March 7, 2011 – Can't sleep? Blame your computer, cell phone | Computerworld

 

March 14, 2012 - Insomnia - the dos and don'ts of a modern epidemic | Newshub

 

June 12, 2012 – Constant Internet access 'causes sleep disorders and depression with late night users most likely to suffer'

People who make heavy use of mobile phones and computers run a greater risk of sleep disturbances, stress and symptoms of mental health

Put together, the results showed a clear link between heavy computer and mobile phone use and disturbed sleep.

Spending long hours in front of the computer was associated with depression in women but not in men. The researchers from the University of Gothenburg suspect this may be to do with differences in the way the sexes use technology.

 

August 1, 2012 – Warwick Medical School researchers have found a rate of 16.6 per cent of the population reporting insomnia and other severe sleep disturbances in the countries surveyed – close to the 20 per cent found in the general adult population in the West, according to nationwide surveys in Canada and the US.

 

Nov 25, 2012 - One-in-three Britons now suffer sleep problems, and hormonal issues mean women are plagued by insomnia more than men

 

February 22, 2013 – How artificial light is wrecking your sleep, and what to do about it

 

June 25, 2013 – Insomnia declared 'public health epidemic'

Americans are so sleep deprived that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention two years ago declared insufficient sleep a national “public health epidemic” that effects productivity and can damage health.

As many as 48 percent of Americans report experiencing occasional insomnia, according to the National Sleep Foundation, while 22 percent report having difficulty sleeping every, or almost every, night.

 

Sep 14, 2013 - You're not alone: insomnia has reached epidemic proportions.

 

January 7, 2014 – Smartphones Can Cause Insomnia: Harvard - Newsmax.com

 

April 4, 2014 – Smartphone light may make most young people lose sleep

The proportion of people thought to be getting too little sleep had risen by a fifth since a "bedroom poll" conducted last year by the National Sleep Foundation.

"This is a huge rise, and the results are extremely worrying because getting less than seven hours sleep a night is below the recommended guidelines, and is associated with a range of problems, including an increased risk of weight gain, heart attacks, diabetes and cancer," Prof Wiseman said.

The people surveyed were asked if they used a computer, tablet or smartphone in the two hours before bed.

They were also asked about dreams and just one in ten agreed with the statement: "I would describe my dreams as pleasant."

 

April 4, 2014 – Six in 10 Brits now sleep deprived because of smartphones and computers

The number of Brits reporting to be sleep deprived has jumped 50 per cent with many more now using smartphones and computers before bed

 

June 26, 2014 – Cell phones believed to cause serious sleep problems -

 

February 2, 2015 – Too much exposure to smartphone screens ruins your sleep, study finds ...

 

February 24, 2015 - How Smartphones Hurt Sleep - The Atlantic

 

February 25, 2015 – Journal of Youth and Adolescence

Adolescents’ Electronic Media Use at Night, Sleep Disturbance, and Depressive Symptoms in the Smartphone Age

Abstract

Adolescence is a time of increasing vulnerability for poor mental health, including depression. Sleep disturbance is an important risk factor for the development of depression during adolescence. Excessive electronic media use at night is a risk factor for both adolescents’ sleep disturbance and depression. To better understand the interplay between sleep, depressive symptoms, and electronic media use at night, this study examined changes in adolescents’ electronic media use at night and sleep associated with smartphone ownership. Also examined was whether sleep disturbance mediated the relationship between electronic media use at night and depressive symptoms. 362 adolescents (12–17 year olds, M = 14.8, SD = 1.3; 44.8 % female) were included and completed questionnaires assessing sleep disturbance (short sleep duration and sleep difficulties) and depressive symptoms. Further, participants reported on their electronic media use in bed before sleep such as frequency of watching TV or movies, playing video games, talking or text messaging on the mobile phone, and spending time online. Smartphone ownership was related to more electronic media use in bed before sleep, particularly calling/sending messages and spending time online compared to adolescents with a conventional mobile phone. Smartphone ownership was also related to later bedtimes while it was unrelated to sleep disturbance and symptoms of depression. Sleep disturbance partially mediated the relationship between electronic media use in bed before sleep and symptoms of depression. Electronic media use was negatively related with sleep duration and positively with sleep difficulties, which in turn were related to depressive symptoms. Sleep difficulties were the more important mediator than sleep duration. The results of this study suggest that adolescents might benefit from education regarding sleep hygiene and the risks of electronic media use at night.

 

June 12, 2015 – Have insomnia? Better night's sleep all in your head - CNN.com

 

June 24, 2015 – Sleepless in America: How Digital Devices Keep Us Up All Night ...

October 12, 2015 – By Dr. Paul Jerard, E-RYT 500. Have you ever wondered how insomnia has become such a major issue?

 

November 5, 2015 – One of the most commonly-cited reasons for insomnia is the blue light emitted from devices like smartphones or laptops

 

November 15, 2015 - Smartphones cause insomnia, study finds

Spending too much time with the blue-tinted screens creates sleeping problems. That lack of sleep can cause diseases, even death. But blue light isn’t all bad, some say

Over 600 participants were studied over 30-day periods, and researchers overwhelmingly found that the more people used their smartphones, particularly just before bed, the worse sleep was for them.

“Screen-time is associated with poor sleep,” the journal article says.

 

June 8, 2016 – The Modern Sleeplessness Epidemic That Isn't -- nymag.com

There Is No Modern Sleeplessness Epidemic

 

August 17, 2016 - Is our fear of insomnia what's actually keeping us up at night? - The ...

 

November 15, 2016 – People addicted to their smartphones have been found to be more prone to having anxiety, insomnia, eye strain and poor social relationships.

 

January 18, 2017 - The silent scourge of mid-life insomnia | Daily Mail Online

The silent scourge of mid-life insomnia: Weight gain, health problems and violent mood swings - one chronic sufferer reveals the toll of the epidemic NO ONE talks about

There is an epidemic of women who simply cannot sleep at night

Liz Bailey, 52, is sometime so tires she can barely even speak

Jacqueline Hooton, 53, says she dreads the thought of bedtime

Do you struggle with insomnia? Email your story to femail@dailymail.co.uk

-

I do all the things the experts recommend to help induce sleep, such as reading and avoiding caffeine, and even have a reminder that flashes up on my phone at 10pm, an hour before I go to bed, to start winding down.

Though I manage to drop off within the hour, come about 1.30am I’ll be awake again, due to either a hot flush or a nightmarewhich I’ve read can also be hormone related.

(tries to pass off nightmares as ‘hormone related’ –ed)

Menopausal women are nearly four times more likely to have insomnia, and recent figures suggest that, in Britain, some 15 million prescriptions for sleeping tablets are thrown at this problem every year. And it’s not just the moodswings: chronic insomnia — defined as disrupted sleep that occurs at least three nights per week and lasts at least three months — has significant health implications and has been linked to obesity, high blood pressure, dementia and even cancer.

The physiological symptoms of the menopause are held principally to blame: hot flushes and adrenaline surges throw me like an ejector seat into wakefulness in the middle of the night, with heart pounding and sheets sopping.

 

 

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Volume 13, number 1

The Use of Technology at Night: Impact on Sleep and Health

Since mankind first tamed fire, we have been using artificial light to extend the waking day. As technology has progressed, our relationship with the night has changed. With widespread use of electric lights, the night has essentially become optional. But this is not an ideal perspective for health and well-being. Adverse outcomes arise from extending wakefulness1,2 or even shifting it later.3,4 In recent years, the use of electronic devices in the bedroom has increased dramatically. However, not much is known at the population level about who uses technology in the bedroom, what sort of technology is used, how much is used, and how this use affects sleep.

In this issue of JCSM, Gradisar and colleagues report results of the 2011 Sleep in America Poll conducted by the National Sleep Foundation, which focused on technology use and relationships to sleep.5 The results show that approximately 90% of Americans report some technology use in the hour before bed. Although television was the most popular overall, young adults were more likely to be using cell phones. Other demographic differences existed as well, with younger adults being more likely to use computers/laptops and video game consoles. Differences regarding gender, race/ethnicity and relationship status were also reported.

The authors also found that technology use was associated with sleep patterns. For example, the more types of devices used, the more individuals reported difficulty falling asleep and maintaining sleep, especially if the use of technology was active. Regarding intrusions into sleep, 22% reported going to sleep with cell phone ringers on in their bedroom and 10% reported awakenings at least a few nights per week due to their phone. Among those with the ringer on, being awakened by the cell phone was significantly associated with difficulty maintaining sleep.

This study had a number of important strengths. The random sample contributes to the generalizability of these findings. Also, this study represents one of the first times that technology use in the bedroom is surveyed, especially relative to sleep. In addition to its strengths, a number of significant limitations suggest future research directions. For example, the lack of precision in the survey instrument makes conclusions difficult to draw. For example, using a phone or tablet or computer could indicate a passive activity (e.g., watching a movie, browsing the internet) or an interactive one (e.g., communicating with people, playing video games, social networking). Some activities may have varying degrees of interactivity; for example, playing a video game or talking on the phone may be more impactful on sleep than texting or browsing the internet. In addition, future research that includes more standard assessments of sleep would aid in interpretations of results and more complex statistical analyses will more thoroughly elucidate relationships.

The landscape of technology use in the bedroom is changing rapidly. We need to design research studies that will effectively assess patterns of use in the real world. For example, it is plausible that individuals who use smartphones are using them in the bedroom—to check emails, send texts, use social networks, play games, or simply use its alarm to wake up in the morning. Perhaps more carefully assessing quantity and timing of passive versus active consumption of technology would be helpful, as would be assessing interruptions by and uses of devices in the middle of the night.

One particular challenge in conducting this type of research is that individual users may themselves not be able to recall specific events in granular detail. An individual user may text for a few minutes, check e-mails, watch a video, then send additional texts before going to bed, all within 15-20 minutes. Indeed, it may be that the only way to accurately capture this data would be through monitoring applications installed on the devices themselves. This requires that researchers not only understand the possible technologies in play, but they may also need to directly manipulate/measure them, with the consent of the user.

Despite these challenges, the issue of technology relative to sleep is an important one. Nearly all adults, especially young adults, use technology before bed. As the possibilities increase for talking, texting, browsing, emailing, working, playing, posting, and reading before bed, and as a portal to information and social networks becomes an arm's reach away in the middle of the night, and as the devices that go “beep” in the night become more common in the bedroom, it is important for sleep researchers to understand how these changing patterns of use affect sleep and, in turn, health and well-being.

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

January 24, 2017
9:09 pm
Jeff
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In the U.S., the overall suicide rate rose by 24% from 1999 to 2014. The rate increased 43% among white men ages 45 to 64, and 63% for women in the same age-range – 20% higher for the women…why? What’s the variable, between men and women?

In the U.K., the number of suicides among women in the UK has increased to its highest level since 2005. Why women, in both the U.S., and the U.K.? What’s the unifying factor?

In the U.S., “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report did not offer an explanation for the steep rise.”

That’s because the words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

In 2015, rates for 8 of the 10 leading causes of death rose.” Across-the-board rising mortality. Why? What’s driving it?

Experts aren't sure what's behind the stall.”

That’s because the words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

And I’ve caught them in a lie, there, in that they formulaically used the word “stall” to hedge, and their use of it here, to refer to a sudden rise in death rates, is illogical. They usually say “stall” to describe something like the “pause” in global warming – a long absence of any rise is called a “pause” or a “stall”, to imply it will continue to go up again, real soon. Mortality rates have been dropping over decades, and now have shot up. That’s not a “stall” in any way. Their use of these terms is so formulaic and repetitive that they sometimes forget themselves.

 

 

April 22, 2016 – US suicide rate surges, particularly among white people

The suicide rate in the US has surged to its highest level in almost three decades, according to a new report.

The increase is particularly pronounced among middle-age white people who now account for a third of all US suicides.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report did not offer an explanation for the steep rise.

The overall suicide rate rose by 24% from 1999 to 2014, according to the CDC. However, the rate increased 43% among white men ages 45 to 64 and 63% for women in the same age-range.

 

Dec 2, 2016 - The number of suicides among women in the UK has increased to its highest level since 2005

 

December 8, 2016 – US life expectancy falls, as many kinds of death increase

In 2015, rates for 8 of the 10 leading causes of death rose. Even more troubling to health experts: the U.S. seems to be settling into a trend of no improvement at all.

With four years, you're starting to see some indication of something a little more ominous," said S. Jay Olshansky, a University of Illinois-Chicago public health researcher.

Experts aren't sure what's behind the stall. Some, like Olshansky, suspect obesity, an underlying factor in some of the largest causes of death, particularly heart disease.

 

January 5, 2017 – Cancer death rate down 25%, fewer men being diagnosed

More than 2.1 million cancer related deaths were avoided between 1991 and 2014 in the US, according to newly released data,

New cancer diagnoses for American men have steadily decreased in the last decade, at about 2 percent per year, while rates for women have remained static, according to annual data ‒ "Cancer Statistics, 2017" ‒ published Thursday by the American Cancer Society (ACS). The decrease in cancer rates for men is attributed primarily to adjustments in prostate cancer screenings.

 

January 10, 2017 – Gynecological Cancer Mortality Rates for Women Increases

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"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth!" Thomas Paine 

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